| Read Time: 3 minutes | Dangerous Drugs

Bloomberg Business: The FDA Recall System is Voluntary and Broken

Bloomberg Business recently published a comprehensive look at how patients suffer when drug manufacturers and regulators fail to protect them and effectively recall dangerous drugs from their medicine cabinets. For the past 25 years, the experienced drug injury lawyers at Cory Watson have helped thousands of victims hurt because of dangerous medical devices and unsafe drugs released without accurate testing. “If you think the FDA is a true watchdog over the safety of drugs put into the marketplace, you are wrong,” said Ernest Cory, managing shareholder of Cory Watson Attorneys. “The FDA only gets what the drug manufacturer wants them to see. And too often, they don’t get the whole story until the product has come onto the marketplace and injured many victims.” Contact us today for a free, confidential case review – Call (877) 562-0000 now or fill out the online consultation form on this page. Zantac Recalled for Carcinogen Contamination In September 2019, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration received a 19-page document with startling claims about a popular medicine. Researchers at Valisure, a Connecticut lab that tests prescription drugs, found extremely high levels of a probable human carcinogen in the antacid ranitidine, best known under the brand name Zantac. Millions of people around the world use ranitidine; it’s available both with a prescription and over the counter. As for the carcinogen, NDMA, the FDA knew it well: For more than a year, the agency had been recalling batches of the blood pressure medication Valsartan contaminated with it. The FDA issued an alert that seemed to downplay the lab’s findings. The agency said it had learned that some ranitidine medicines contained low levels of NDMA, but it wasn’t advising people to stop taking the drug. Those with prescriptions could contact their doctors — if they were worried — and everyone else could consider alternatives on drugstore shelves. However, high levels of NDMA were found in every version of ranitidine tested, and labs concluded the problem was inherent to the molecule itself. In other words, there is no safe version of ranitidine. The FDA’s Limited Authority Over Recalls By mid-October, a month after the FDA’s alert, at least two dozen countries had pulled ranitidine from stores or halted its distribution. Numerous companies acted on their own to slow or stop the supply of the drug. The FDA continued to conduct tests. 43 jurisdictions and governments around the world took action before the United States did. Finally, on November 1, the agency announced that it had found higher-than-acceptable levels of NDMA in some ranitidine. The FDA then asked manufacturers to voluntarily recall some of the Zantac on the market. When the FDA finds that a drug’s quality is compromised, recalls are supposed to reverse the supply chain and remove the affected product from warehouses, pharmacy shelves, and patients’ medicine cabinets. But the agency’s authority over this system is limited. It can only request a pullback – the manufacturers can say no, and they often refuse. The FDA can’t contact patients directly; it relies on pharmacies for that. It also doesn’t control how the recall is conducted or how its effectiveness is assessed. A probable carcinogen in a medication taken by millions of people, manufactured in a factory that the FDA knew had problems, is a crisis for the agency. An effective recall system is crucial to prevent further injuries. How Do You Stop Taking a Recalled Medication If You Don’t Know It’s Been Recalled? Patients using Valsartan and Zantac were supposed to be notified by their pharmacies that their drugs could be dangerous. Those notifications didn’t always happen. Old mailing addresses, a switch in pharmacies or the use of more than one, and failure to distinguish a recall letter from junk mail can all interfere with alerting patients to dangerous drugs. There are also gaps in the flow of information, especially when drugs are recalled in batches identified by manufacturers’ lot numbers, as is common practice. Meanwhile, the number of anxious patients mounts. The failure of that system can be seen in the client base of plaintiffs’ attorney Ernest Cory of Cory Watson, a firm representing hundreds of people who took the potentially-tainted drugs. Many of his clients hadn’t been warned of the FDA recall, and only found out on through the news, social media, or through attorney advertising. Don’t Sit On Your Rights The experienced drug injury attorneys at Cory Watson are evaluating the claims of hundreds of people with cancer – liver, stomach, intestinal, colon, pancreatic, or kidney – who took these drugs. Hundreds of lawsuits have been filed against Valsartan and Zantac drug manufacturers involved in the recalls. If you or a loved one developed cancer after taking these drugs, call today for your FREE case evaluation. Call (877) 562-0000 or fill out the online case consultation form on this page.

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| Read Time: 2 minutes | Dangerous Drugs

Here’s Why Zantac Was Pulled From Drugstores, And What You Should Do Now

According to the New York Times, major drugstore retailers have pulled Zantac off of their shelves due to certain versions of the heartburn medication containing potentially cancer-causing ingredients. Pharmacy chains announced that they were no longer selling the product after the Food and Drug Administration issued a statement in September 2019 saying that Zantac and its generic form, ranitidine, may contain high levels of N-nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA), a human carcinogen. If you’re looking for an experienced drug injury lawyer to help you pursue justice and compensation in a Zantac lawsuit, call (877) 562-0000 today or fill out the online consultation form on this page. F.D.A Warns of Zantac Cancer Risks The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) announced that it is investigating Zantac cancer risks. Recent testing of Zantac tablets found that the commonly-used heartburn medication contains a potentially dangerous carcinogenic chemical up to 26,000 times greater than the FDA’s daily intake limit. The carcinogenic chemical present in Zantac is known as N-nitrosodimethylamine (“NDMA”). What Is NDMA? N-nitrosodimethylamine is a semi-volatile chemical that belongs to a class of known potent carcinogens, according to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). The industrial chemical is used in gasoline, as a stabilizer for industry materials, and as a lubricant additive. NDMA has also been used to make liquid rocket fuel, and is a byproduct of manufacturing certain pesticides and processing fish. Does Zantac Cause Cancer? Since the 1980s, studies have demonstrated a link between the NDMA in Zantac and cancer. Mounting evidence also shows that Sanofi and Boehringer Ingelheim, the big pharma companies that make Zantac (ranitidine), concealed the Zantac cancer link from millions of people who took the drug for heartburn, gastric and duodenal ulcers, gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), sour stomach, Barrett’s esophagus, acid reflux and other issues. This deception came as the companies made unprecedented profits from Zantac, the first drug to generate $1 billion in sales. With countless people stricken with cancer after taking Zantac, many are turning to the courts and filing a Zantac lawsuit to hold large pharmaceutical companies like Sanofi and Boehringer Ingelheim accountable for their reckless disregard for human health and willingness to put profit over people. What are the Long-Term Side Effects Linked to Zantac NDMA Exposure? Long-term exposure to Zantac or its generic active ingredient, ranitidine, can lead to an increased risk of developing cancer. Side effects of Zantac include: Bladder cancer Colon and Rectal cancer Esophageal cancer Intestinal cancer Kidney cancer Liver cancer Lung cancer (non-smokers) Ovarian cancer Pancreatic cancer Prostate cancer Stomach cancer Testicular cancer Thyroid cancer Uterine cancer Which Zantac Brands and Products Contain Ranitidine? Some of the most common Zantac brands include: Zantac 150 Tablets Zantac 150 Maximum Strength Zantac 150 Maximum Strength Cool Mint Zantac 75 Tablets Wal-Zan 150 Wal-Zan 75 Heartburn Relief (ranitidine) Acid Reducer (ranitidine) Acid Control (ranitidine) How Can a Zantac Lawsuit Help Me? If you’ve been injured by Zantac, we know you’ve suffered emotionally and financially, and want to work with you personally to obtain the maximum compensation for the damages caused by your injuries. Contact us today to learn more about your legal rights! Call (877) 562-0000 now.

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| Read Time: 3 minutes | Cory Watson Attorneys

Cory Watson Leads Charge on Opioid Litigation Battle in Arkansas

Arkansas Counties and Cities File Joint Lawsuit Against Opioid Drug Manufacturers Cory Watson Attorneys is leading the charge on groundbreaking opioid litigation, working with county, city and state officials to represent the people of Arkansas in the fight against the opioid epidemic. In an unprecedented approach, hundreds of county, city, state officials, and employees gathered Wednesday on the steps of the Arkansas State Capitol to announce that they have filed a lawsuit against the opioid drug industry. The lawsuit seeks damages from more than 50 drug companies. The money recovered would fund remediation of the opioid epidemic in Arkansas. This unified litigation is unlike any others in the country and will represent 90 percent of Arkansas’s population, with 72 counties and 210 cities participating. The lawyers at Cory Watson will help combat the opioid manufacturers who have raked in billions in profits at the expense of devastated families and communities across the country. The attorneys argue that it will cost Arkansas cities and counties billions to stop the Arkansas opioid epidemic, and that the companies that aggressively marketed the opioids should foot the bill instead of the taxpayers. “This is an attempt by Arkansas counties and cities to force opioid manufacturers to pay to clean up the Arkansas opioid epidemic that the complaint alleges the opioid industry directly caused,” said Cory Watson attorney F. Jerome Tapley in an interview with CNN. Tapley is leading the legal team that includes lawyers from Arkansas firm Rainwater, Holt & Sexton. City and county leaders agree the opioid lawsuit is the best way to handle the ongoing crisis. Don Zimmerman, Executive Director of the Arkansas Municipal League said, “Arkansas’s one-voice approach to this lawsuit is one that gives us a seat at the table. Neither the state or any country or city is big enough alone; this litigation approach ensures that recover damages remain in Arkansas.” The opioid epidemic has ravaged Arkansas communities for years. While the U.S. experiences more than 42,000 fatal overdoses a year, Arkansas experiences over 400, a number that has increased nearly 300 percent since 2000 and coincides with opioid sales quadrupling. Additionally, Arkansas ranks second in the nation in the misuse of opioids behind Alabama, which is the only other state with a higher opioid prescribing rate than Arkansas according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Chris Villines, Executive Director of the Association of Arkansas Counties said, “Instead of fighting and competing with each other on critically needed settlement dollars for our cities and counties, all of the cities and counties are working together to do what’s best for Arkansas.” Watch the Opioid Litigation News Conference coverage below. Cory Watson attorney F. Jerome Tapley speaks at the 30:17 mark. Cory Watson Attorneys, a premier national litigation firm, is working with county, city and state officials in Arkansas to help fight the opioid epidemic. Related News: CNN: One state’s novel idea to make Big Pharma pay for opioid epidemic Newsweek: Opioid Crisis: Is Arkansas paving the way for Big Pharma, not taxpayers, to pay for addiction? Talk Business & Politics: Attorney: Governments seeking to recover ‘probably … billions’ from opioid companies Route Fifty: As Courts See Local Flood of Opioid Lawsuits, Litigation Strategies Can Vary By State Facing Addiction: Arkansas Sues 52 Opioid Manufacturers and 13 Others Arkansas Online: In opioid lawsuits, state aim is 1 voice Arkansas Democrat-Gazette: County group seeks payout in suit THV11: Coalition of Arkansas cities, counties sue opioid makers for deception The Outlook: Alexander City’s Tapley takes on opioid makers for Arkansas and counties CBS This Morning: Purdue Pharma’s deceptive sales tactics?

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| Read Time: 2 minutes | Dangerous Drugs

What You Need to Know About Opioid Drug Lawsuits

Opioid use in the United States has reached epidemic levels. Opioids are highly addictive and dangerous, but have been increasingly prescribed over the past two decades. In July 2017, President Trump’s Commission on Combating Drug Addiction and the Opioid Crisis declared that opioids were killing roughly 142 people in the U.S. each day. This tally was vividly described as “September 11th every three weeks.” The CDC reports that, since 1999, opioid prescriptions – and opioid deaths – have quadrupled in the United States. In 2014, almost 2 million Americans abused or were dependent on prescription opioids. Many victims of America’s opioid epidemic are now filing lawsuits against physicians, pharmacists, and drug wholesalers. The allegations in these lawsuits claim that these doctors and entities caused or contributed to their addictions to prescription painkillers. What Are Opioids & How Do They Work? Opioid narcotics are a class of painkiller drugs that bind to opioid receptors to block or reduce feelings of pain. These powerful drugs are often prescribed for patients who have just had surgery or experienced physical trauma from a car accident or sports injury. The most commonly prescribed opioid medications include: • Oxycodone (brand names: OxyContin, Roxicodone, Oxecta) • Hydrocodone • Methadone • Fentanyl • Morphine Upon its release in 1995, OxyContin was hailed as a medical breakthrough. The drug became a “blockbuster” and reportedly generated $35 billion dollars in profit. However, OxyContin is a controversial and potentially addictive drug. Its sole active ingredient is oxycodone, a chemical cousin of heroin which is up to twice as powerful as morphine. Drug manufacturers compete to market “blockbuster” drugs like OxyContin for profit at the expense of patient safety. An increasing number of states are now taking action to sue opioid drug makers for their gross misrepresentation of the safety of these medications. The allegations include claims that these drug makers were negligent by: • Over prescribing opioids • Understating the addictive qualities of opioid drugs • Failing to warn the public about serious, potentially life-threatening risks associated with opioid use How Cory Watson Can Help You Cory Watson Attorneys is a part of the movement to hold Big Pharma accountable for practices that have contributed to the growing epidemic of opioid abuse. The injury lawyers at Cory Watson have more than 30 years of experience helping victims nationwide, and aren’t afraid to take on the biggest players in the pharmaceutical industry. If you or a loved one has been severely injured by a drug or medical device, it’s easy to get the help you need—just call (877) 562-0000 or complete our free initial consultation form. As a leading national injury law firm, we serve clients throughout the country as well as our home state of Alabama. Don’t delay getting the help you need. It takes just minutes to get started, and the initial conversation is always free!  

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| Read Time: 2 minutes | Dangerous Drugs

Heartburn Medication Linked to Kidney Failure

Nexium, Prevacid, Prilosec, Protonix, AciPhex and Zegerid are in a class of drugs called Proton Pump Inhibitors (PPIs) that are widely prescribed to treat heartburn, acid reflux and gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) in millions of Americans. These common medications are available over-the-counter or by prescription. Research published in the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA) Internal Medicine, January 2016, shows that those taking PPIs once a day had a 15% increased risk of chronic kidney disease. The study also shows that those who took PPIs twice a day were 46% more likely to develop chronic kidney disease. The study also found that those who took PPIs had a 39% higher risk of kidney disease than patients that took H2 blockers (Tagamet, Pepcid & Zantac), a different type of drug used to treat acid reflux. In an April 2016 study published in the Journal of the American Society of Nephrology, the risk of end-stage renal disease was 96% higher in those who took PPIs. Side Effects: Nexium, Prevacid, and Prilosec Dangerous side effects associated with these medications are: Acute Kidney/Renal Failure Acute Interstitial Nephritis Chronic Kidney/Renal Disease Dialysis Treatment You May Qualify for Compensation You and your family rely on your medication and your doctor to keep you safe. If manufacturers failed to inform you or your doctor of the potential side effects, or you suffered adverse reactions without warning of the potential consequences of taking the drug, you may have grounds to file a lawsuit against the drug’s manufacturer. At Cory Watson Attorneys, we hold pharmaceutical companies responsible when they produce dangerous drugs. Companies that are negligent and endanger the public need to be held accountable when their products cause harm. Get Justice Today If you or a loved one suffered from kidney failure while taking Nexium, Prevacid, or Prilosec, you may have suffered a serious side effect caused by taking the heartburn medications. You may be able to file a lawsuit and seek financial compensation from the drug’s manufacturer for the injuries that you or your family have experienced. Don’t wait to reach out –  contact the experienced attorneys at Cory Watson today.  Do not stop taking a prescribed medication without consulting with your doctor.

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| Read Time: < 1 minute | Dangerous Drugs

Popular Heartburn Medications Linked to Kidney Injury

More than 15 million Americans currently rely on proton pump inhibitor (PPI) drugs to relieve heartburn and acid reflux caused by excessive acid produced by the stomach. Stomach acid can cause irritation in patients, and PPI drugs aim to reduce production of stomach acid to reduce irritation. PPIs are the most prescribed acid reflux medication today, and common PPI drugs include Nexium®, Prevacid®, Prilosec®, and others.  But what many people don’t know is that taking a PPI has been linked with an increased risk of severe health issues, including chronic kidney disease, kidney damage, acute interstitial nephritis, and renal disease. While people have been taking PPI drugs for years, new research shows that they can lead to many serious complications including severe kidney disease.  A recent study in JAMA Internal Medicine found that the use of PPI drugs “was independently associated with a 20% to 50% higher risk of” developing chronic kidney disease. This risk didn’t translate to H2 blockers—another type of medication that, like PPI drugs, is used to relieve heartburn and acid reflux. According to the study, the increased risk for chronic kidney disease “was specific to PPI medications because the use of [H2 Blockers] . . . was not independently associated with” chronic kidney disease. You may be entitled to compensation if you or someone you love developed chronic kidney disease or experienced kidney failure while taking Nexium®, Prevacid®, Prilosec®, Losec®, Protonix®, or Zegerid®. At Cory Watson Attorneys, our drug injury lawyers are ready to help protect your rights. You don’t have to let drug companies get away with producing products that cause more harm than good—call (877) 686-8992 or complete our free initial consultation form to get experienced legal help now.

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| Read Time: 3 minutes | Dangerous Drugs

Zofran Linked to Potential Birth Defects

Zofran (generic name: ondansetron) is a popular anti-nausea prescription drug, approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for treatment of nausea and vomiting in cancer patients after surgery. The drug is manufactured by GlaxoSmithKline (GSK), a large pharmaceutical company based in the United Kingdom. While Zofran is only FDA-approved for treatment of nausea and vomiting in postoperative and cancer patients, it is also prescribed as treatment for pregnancy-associated vomiting and nausea, commonly referred to as “morning sickness.” Birth defects caused by Zofran Zofran and its generic form Ondansetron have been linked to birth defects caused by the drug’s non-FDA approved, or “off-label,” use to treat morning sickness in pregnant women. An estimated 70 to 90 percent of pregnant women experience morning sickness, and about 15 percent of all pregnant women experience morning sickness severe enough to warrant medication. Morning sickness is most common during the first trimester of pregnancy, although it can still occur later down the line.  During the first trimester, the developing fetus is at its most vulnerable to damage caused by a harmful drug. Zofran use during pregnancy has been shown to significantly increase the risk of severe birth defects. Potential birth defects caused by Zofran (ondansetron) include, but are not necessarily limited to: Heart defects, such as atrial or ventricular septal defects (holes in the heart), and heart murmurs Cleft lip and cleft palate Kidney damage and/or failure Organ malformation or malpositioning Miscarriage and stillbirth Off-label drugs and pregnancy “Off label” use describes when a medication is prescribed for a condition(s) not approved by the FDA.  Most people would assume that when their doctor prescribes them a drug, that medication has been FDA-approved for the specific condition they have. However, off-label prescriptions are actually a common practice.  About one in five prescriptions written in the United States are off-label, according to a 2006 study by researchers at Dartmouth Medical School. Ethical considerations prevent most drugs from being tested in pregnant patients before approval.  As a result, few drugs are expressly approved for use during pregnancy, and the effects of most drugs on fetal development as well as the risk of birth defects are poorly understood.  This also means that the proportion of drugs prescribed off-label to pregnant women is particularly high. One in four pregnant women in America prescribed Zofran or Ondansetron In an editorial published in the December 2014 issue of the American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Dr. Gideon Koren reports: 97.7 percent of prescriptions for the treatment of nausea and vomiting [aka morning sickness] in the United States are with medications not labeled for use in pregnancy, not indicated for nausea and vomiting in pregnancy, and not classified as safe in pregnancy by the Food and Drug Administration. Koren highlights the steady increase in ondansetron prescriptions for treatment of morning sickness from 50,000 per month in 2008 to 110,000 per month in 2013.  Assuming this trend has since held steady, this means that roughly 1 million pregnant women out of 4 million total pregnancies per year in the United States are exposed to Zofran or its generic, ondansetron. 2012 GSK settlement In 2012, GlaxoSmithKline (GSK) pled guilty on criminal and civil charges brought against the company by the Department of Justice for failure to report safety data and unlawful promotion of a number of its drugs, including Zofran.  GSK ended up paying 3 Billion to resolve charges – the largest pharmaceutical settlement in U.S. history. GSK promoted Zofran for non-approved use for treatment of morning sickness and also paid kickbacks to physicians for prescribing the drug. This 2012 settlement does not clear GSK of its liability for damages or injuries that may have been caused by Zofran. We want to help The attorneys at Cory Watson have represented families harmed by the negligence and wrongful conduct of others for more than thirty years, and our lawyers are currently representing women and children harmed by Zofran and other drugs. If you or a loved one were injured by Zofran or another prescription drug, call today for a free consultation at this number: 877-686-8992

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| Read Time: 2 minutes | Dangerous Drugs

FDA Delays Rule on Generic Drug Labels Until 2017

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has again delayed a decision on whether generic drug makers will be held responsible for warning patients about the risks of their medications. This comes as a disappointment to trial lawyers and consumer groups who want to eliminate the legal loophole which prevents patients from suing generic drug manufacturers for dangerous generic drugs. The majority of prescription drugs dispensed in the U.S. are generic drugs, and the companies that market them are not subject to the same warning label rules as their name brand counterparts. To get a generic drug approved for sale in the U.S., the generic drug manufacturer must prove that their generic is chemically identical to the name brand, and the label on the generic drug is identical to the one on the name brand drug. Generic drug manufacturers are not required to do any testing on the drug or update the use, safety and warning information as new medical and scientific information is learned unless the brand name drug manufacturer first updates the label information. This regulatory scheme creates very serious health dangers to consumers using generic drugs.  First, if the brand name drug is defective, then the generic equivalent is also defective, but most courts hold that only the name brand drug manufacturer can be sued and held responsible. So, the patients taking the generic equivalents have no lawsuit when harmed by the defective generic. Second, when a brand name drug is no longer made and sold, the brand name drug company is no longer responsible for researching and updating safety information. This means that if the drug is still available as a generic only, there is no company doing the research and updating the safety information. So if new dangers about the drug are learned, this information is not provided to the consumer by any manufacturer. The FDA’s decision is troubling. Dr. Michael Carome, speaking as director of the Public Citizen’s Health Research Group, said, “The F.D.A. is plainly bowing to industry pressure and, in the process, prioritizing industry profits over patient health and safety.” Dr. Carome is one of many consumer advocates who had hoped the FDA would fix this safety and accountability gap. Generic drug manufacturers object to a change in the industry standard, saying that it would create confusion as equivalent drugs could have different warning labels. Manufacturers have proposed an alternative in which the FDA would be responsible for making decisions regarding label changes. However, consumer advocates have pointed out that the agency does not test drugs and does not have the resources to monitor new developments in drug safety information. Please join Cory Watson Attorneys in supporting safer drug labeling.

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| Read Time: < 1 minute | Dangerous Drugs

FDA Investigating Invokana Amputation Problems

The FDA released a safety announcement alerting the public to a new study that found an increase in leg and foot amputations in patients who used Invokana (canagliflozin) to treat type 2 diabetes. This warning comes on the heels of several other FDA warnings regarding the drug such as diabetic ketoacidosis, kidney failure, and bone fractures. What is Invokana? Invokana is a prescription medicine used to help lower blood sugar in adults with type 2 diabetes. It is part of a class of drugs known as SGLT2 inhibitors, which lower blood sugar by aiding the kidneys in removing sugar through urine. This new class of diabetes treatments has already been linked to many reports of kidney failure and there are already many claims which may be presented against the drug’s manufacturer, Johnson & Johnson. In the ongoing Invokana study, an increased risk of leg and foot amputations have been found as amputations occurred about twice as often in patients who used Invokana as compared to patients who used a placebo. These amputations were most commonly around the toes and feet, but some patients had to have larger amputations of the leg after taking the drug. Get Help with Your Invokana Lawsuit If you or a loved one has fallen victim to these bad drugs and has suffered amputation, kidney failure, or has been hospitalized, our attorneys can help to make sure that you receive the compensation that you deserve. Cory Watson Attorneys believes companies that produce dangerous drugs should be held accountable for their negligence. If you were affected by any of the SGLT2 diabetes drugs, contact us today for a free, no-obligation consultation. Call (877) 562-0000 or complete our free initial consultation form to get started with your claim today.

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| Read Time: < 1 minute | Drug Litigation

FDA Issues New Abilify® Warning

Cory Watson Attorneys is no longer accepting these cases. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) issued a new warning on May 3 that links the use of Aripiprazole (Abilify, Abilify Maintena, Aristada) with compulsive or uncontrollable urges such as binge eating, excessive shopping, gambling, and an increase in sex drive. Abilify users reported that these behaviors stopped when the medicine was discontinued or the dose was reduced. According to the FDA safety announcement, “pathological gambling is listed as a reported side effect in the current aripiprazole drug labels, this description does not entirely reflect the nature of the impulse-control risk FDA identified. In addition, FDA has become aware of other compulsive behaviors associated with aripiprazole, such as compulsive eating, shopping, and sexual actions. These compulsive behaviors can affect anyone who is taking the medicine. As a result, FDA is adding new warnings about all of these compulsive behaviors to the drug labels and the patient Medication Guides for all aripiprazole products.” This is the strongest FDA warning to date about the risks associated with the popular drug Abilify, prescribed to treat certain mental disorders, including schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, Tourette’s disorder, and irritability associated with autistic disorder. There is help available for Abilify users who have suffered as a result of taking the drug. The experienced drug injury lawyers at Cory Watson Attorneys are representing hundreds of Abilify victims nationwide and are available for a free consultation. If you or a loved one has suffered while taking Abilify, call now at (877) 562-0000 or quickly fill out our online contact form. Please consult with your doctor before stopping or changing any prescription medication.

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