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Heartburn Medication Linked to Kidney Failure

Nexium, Prevacid, Prilosec, Protonix, AciPhex and Zegerid are in a class of drugs called Proton Pump Inhibitors (PPIs) that are widely prescribed to treat heartburn, acid reflux and gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) in millions of Americans. These common medications are available over-the-counter or by prescription. Research published in the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA) Internal Medicine, January 2016, shows that those taking PPIs once a day had a 15% increased risk of chronic kidney disease. The study also shows that those who took PPIs twice a day were 46% more likely to develop chronic kidney disease. The study also found that those who took PPIs had a 39% higher risk of kidney disease than patients that took H2 blockers (Tagamet, Pepcid & Zantac), a different type of drug used to treat acid reflux. In an April 2016 study published in the Journal of the American Society of Nephrology, the risk of end-stage renal disease was 96% higher in those who took PPIs. Side Effects: Nexium, Prevacid, and Prilosec Dangerous side effects associated with these medications are: Acute Kidney/Renal Failure Acute Interstitial Nephritis Chronic Kidney/Renal Disease Dialysis Treatment You May Qualify for Compensation You and your family rely on your medication and your doctor to keep you safe. If manufacturers failed to inform you or your doctor of the potential side effects, or you suffered adverse reactions without warning of the potential consequences of taking the drug, you may have grounds to file a lawsuit against the drug’s manufacturer. At Cory Watson Attorneys, we hold pharmaceutical companies responsible when they produce dangerous drugs. Companies that are negligent and endanger the public need to be held accountable when their products cause harm. Get Justice Today If you or a loved one suffered from kidney failure while taking Nexium, Prevacid, or Prilosec, you may have suffered a serious side effect caused by taking the heartburn medications. You may be able to file a lawsuit and seek financial compensation from the drug’s manufacturer for the injuries that you or your family have experienced. Don’t wait to reach out –  contact the experienced attorneys at Cory Watson today.  Do not stop taking a prescribed medication without consulting with your doctor.

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| Read Time: 2 minutes | Dangerous Drugs

Taxotere® Linked to Permanent Hair Loss

American women are more likely to be diagnosed with breast cancer than any other form of cancer. And when women undergo chemotherapy while fighting the disease, they are often given Taxotere®, an injectable drug. While most patients are told to expect temporary hair loss during their treatment, some cancer survivors who were treated with Taxotere experience a side effect they weren’t warned about—permanent significant hair loss (alopecia) of the head, face (eyelashes and eyebrows) and body. Permanent hair loss is more than cosmetic for cancer survivors; it is a constant reminder of their struggle and loss.  Hair loss is ranked amongst the most troubling side effects of cancer, as it can be distressing and can seriously affect a women’s self-esteem. A study published in Annals of Oncology examined 20 female breast cancer patients and linked Taxotere to severe and permanent female hair loss. Other known causes of permanent female hair loss were excluded in the study and multiple treatments were all ineffective. At Cory Watson Attorneys, we’ve helped drug injury victims through some of the most difficult times of their lives for more than 30 years. Our lawyers understand the incredible battle that cancer survivors must endure to get to remission, and we don’t think it’s right that you should have to endure an unexpected side effect that can affect your body image and self-esteem for life. We’ve helped clients across the nation recover more than 3 Billion for their injuries, and our drug injury attorneys can help you, too. Call our 24/7 team to get started now—call (877) 686-8992 or complete our free initial consultation form.

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Popular Heartburn Medications Linked to Kidney Injury

More than 15 million Americans currently rely on proton pump inhibitor (PPI) drugs to relieve heartburn and acid reflux caused by excessive acid produced by the stomach. Stomach acid can cause irritation in patients, and PPI drugs aim to reduce production of stomach acid to reduce irritation. PPIs are the most prescribed acid reflux medication today, and common PPI drugs include Nexium®, Prevacid®, Prilosec®, and others.  But what many people don’t know is that taking a PPI has been linked with an increased risk of severe health issues, including chronic kidney disease, kidney damage, acute interstitial nephritis, and renal disease. While people have been taking PPI drugs for years, new research shows that they can lead to many serious complications including severe kidney disease.  A recent study in JAMA Internal Medicine found that the use of PPI drugs “was independently associated with a 20% to 50% higher risk of” developing chronic kidney disease. This risk didn’t translate to H2 blockers—another type of medication that, like PPI drugs, is used to relieve heartburn and acid reflux. According to the study, the increased risk for chronic kidney disease “was specific to PPI medications because the use of [H2 Blockers] . . . was not independently associated with” chronic kidney disease. You may be entitled to compensation if you or someone you love developed chronic kidney disease or experienced kidney failure while taking Nexium®, Prevacid®, Prilosec®, Losec®, Protonix®, or Zegerid®. At Cory Watson Attorneys, our drug injury lawyers are ready to help protect your rights. You don’t have to let drug companies get away with producing products that cause more harm than good—call (877) 686-8992 or complete our free initial consultation form to get experienced legal help now.

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| Read Time: 3 minutes | Dangerous Drugs

Zofran Linked to Potential Birth Defects

Zofran (generic name: ondansetron) is a popular anti-nausea prescription drug, approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for treatment of nausea and vomiting in cancer patients after surgery. The drug is manufactured by GlaxoSmithKline (GSK), a large pharmaceutical company based in the United Kingdom. While Zofran is only FDA-approved for treatment of nausea and vomiting in postoperative and cancer patients, it is also prescribed as treatment for pregnancy-associated vomiting and nausea, commonly referred to as “morning sickness.” Birth defects caused by Zofran Zofran and its generic form Ondansetron have been linked to birth defects caused by the drug’s non-FDA approved, or “off-label,” use to treat morning sickness in pregnant women. An estimated 70 to 90 percent of pregnant women experience morning sickness, and about 15 percent of all pregnant women experience morning sickness severe enough to warrant medication. Morning sickness is most common during the first trimester of pregnancy, although it can still occur later down the line.  During the first trimester, the developing fetus is at its most vulnerable to damage caused by a harmful drug. Zofran use during pregnancy has been shown to significantly increase the risk of severe birth defects. Potential birth defects caused by Zofran (ondansetron) include, but are not necessarily limited to: Heart defects, such as atrial or ventricular septal defects (holes in the heart), and heart murmurs Cleft lip and cleft palate Kidney damage and/or failure Organ malformation or malpositioning Miscarriage and stillbirth Off-label drugs and pregnancy “Off label” use describes when a medication is prescribed for a condition(s) not approved by the FDA.  Most people would assume that when their doctor prescribes them a drug, that medication has been FDA-approved for the specific condition they have. However, off-label prescriptions are actually a common practice.  About one in five prescriptions written in the United States are off-label, according to a 2006 study by researchers at Dartmouth Medical School. Ethical considerations prevent most drugs from being tested in pregnant patients before approval.  As a result, few drugs are expressly approved for use during pregnancy, and the effects of most drugs on fetal development as well as the risk of birth defects are poorly understood.  This also means that the proportion of drugs prescribed off-label to pregnant women is particularly high. One in four pregnant women in America prescribed Zofran or Ondansetron In an editorial published in the December 2014 issue of the American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Dr. Gideon Koren reports: 97.7 percent of prescriptions for the treatment of nausea and vomiting [aka morning sickness] in the United States are with medications not labeled for use in pregnancy, not indicated for nausea and vomiting in pregnancy, and not classified as safe in pregnancy by the Food and Drug Administration. Koren highlights the steady increase in ondansetron prescriptions for treatment of morning sickness from 50,000 per month in 2008 to 110,000 per month in 2013.  Assuming this trend has since held steady, this means that roughly 1 million pregnant women out of 4 million total pregnancies per year in the United States are exposed to Zofran or its generic, ondansetron. 2012 GSK settlement In 2012, GlaxoSmithKline (GSK) pled guilty on criminal and civil charges brought against the company by the Department of Justice for failure to report safety data and unlawful promotion of a number of its drugs, including Zofran.  GSK ended up paying 3 Billion to resolve charges – the largest pharmaceutical settlement in U.S. history. GSK promoted Zofran for non-approved use for treatment of morning sickness and also paid kickbacks to physicians for prescribing the drug. This 2012 settlement does not clear GSK of its liability for damages or injuries that may have been caused by Zofran. We want to help The attorneys at Cory Watson have represented families harmed by the negligence and wrongful conduct of others for more than thirty years, and our lawyers are currently representing women and children harmed by Zofran and other drugs. If you or a loved one were injured by Zofran or another prescription drug, call today for a free consultation at this number: 877-686-8992

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| Read Time: 2 minutes | Dangerous Drugs

FDA Delays Rule on Generic Drug Labels Until 2017

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has again delayed a decision on whether generic drug makers will be held responsible for warning patients about the risks of their medications. This comes as a disappointment to trial lawyers and consumer groups who want to eliminate the legal loophole which prevents patients from suing generic drug manufacturers for dangerous generic drugs. The majority of prescription drugs dispensed in the U.S. are generic drugs, and the companies that market them are not subject to the same warning label rules as their name brand counterparts. To get a generic drug approved for sale in the U.S., the generic drug manufacturer must prove that their generic is chemically identical to the name brand, and the label on the generic drug is identical to the one on the name brand drug. Generic drug manufacturers are not required to do any testing on the drug or update the use, safety and warning information as new medical and scientific information is learned unless the brand name drug manufacturer first updates the label information. This regulatory scheme creates very serious health dangers to consumers using generic drugs.  First, if the brand name drug is defective, then the generic equivalent is also defective, but most courts hold that only the name brand drug manufacturer can be sued and held responsible. So, the patients taking the generic equivalents have no lawsuit when harmed by the defective generic. Second, when a brand name drug is no longer made and sold, the brand name drug company is no longer responsible for researching and updating safety information. This means that if the drug is still available as a generic only, there is no company doing the research and updating the safety information. So if new dangers about the drug are learned, this information is not provided to the consumer by any manufacturer. The FDA’s decision is troubling. Dr. Michael Carome, speaking as director of the Public Citizen’s Health Research Group, said, “The F.D.A. is plainly bowing to industry pressure and, in the process, prioritizing industry profits over patient health and safety.” Dr. Carome is one of many consumer advocates who had hoped the FDA would fix this safety and accountability gap. Generic drug manufacturers object to a change in the industry standard, saying that it would create confusion as equivalent drugs could have different warning labels. Manufacturers have proposed an alternative in which the FDA would be responsible for making decisions regarding label changes. However, consumer advocates have pointed out that the agency does not test drugs and does not have the resources to monitor new developments in drug safety information. Please join Cory Watson Attorneys in supporting safer drug labeling.

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FDA Investigating Invokana Amputation Problems

The FDA released a safety announcement alerting the public to a new study that found an increase in leg and foot amputations in patients who used Invokana (canagliflozin) to treat type 2 diabetes. This warning comes on the heels of several other FDA warnings regarding the drug such as diabetic ketoacidosis, kidney failure, and bone fractures. What is Invokana? Invokana is a prescription medicine used to help lower blood sugar in adults with type 2 diabetes. It is part of a class of drugs known as SGLT2 inhibitors, which lower blood sugar by aiding the kidneys in removing sugar through urine. This new class of diabetes treatments has already been linked to many reports of kidney failure and there are already many claims which may be presented against the drug’s manufacturer, Johnson & Johnson. In the ongoing Invokana study, an increased risk of leg and foot amputations have been found as amputations occurred about twice as often in patients who used Invokana as compared to patients who used a placebo. These amputations were most commonly around the toes and feet, but some patients had to have larger amputations of the leg after taking the drug. Get Help with Your Invokana Lawsuit If you or a loved one has fallen victim to these bad drugs and has suffered amputation, kidney failure, or has been hospitalized, our attorneys can help to make sure that you receive the compensation that you deserve. Cory Watson Attorneys believes companies that produce dangerous drugs should be held accountable for their negligence. If you were affected by any of the SGLT2 diabetes drugs, contact us today for a free, no-obligation consultation. Call (877) 562-0000 or complete our free initial consultation form to get started with your claim today.

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Drug Injury Lawyers Examining Invokana® Ketoacidosis Cases

In March 2013, a medication called Invokana® was approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to help control blood glucose levels in patients suffering from type 2 diabetes. Since then, information has surfaced that shows using Invokana can cause a person to develop ketoacidosis, a condition in which acid levels in the blood can accumulate and become toxic. Despite being made aware of the link between Invokana and ketoacidosis, the makers of Invokana continued to market the drug and hid information regarding the dangers of the drug from the public. The FDA eventually issued a safety alert regarding the use of Invokana, which in turn prompted many who had been injured by the drug to seek compensation for their losses through civil litigation. The drug injury lawyers at Cory Watson Attorneys are filing Invokana lawsuits on behalf of a number of individuals who were harmed by the medication and are examining other potential cases of harm caused by Invokana nationwide. If you took Invokana and suffered serious adverse health effects, we want to help. Contact us today to get answers regarding your legal rights. Call (877) 562-0000 now to learn more.

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Report Shows Increase in Deaths and Injuries from Prescription Drugs

The independent non-profit organization, Institute for Safe Medication Practices (ISMP), has released its annual QuarterWatch report for the year 2014. QuarterWatch monitors the safety of prescription medications by tracking reports of adverse drug events submitted to the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) by drug manufacturers, health professionals, and consumers. It is estimated that adverse drug events are responsible for 100,000 to 200,000 patient deaths and 1 to 2 million hospitalizations each year.  Nevertheless, the FDA, as well as the Centers for Disease Control (CDC), does not publish annual reviews of injuries and deaths caused by adverse reactions to prescription drugs. The ISMP’s QuarterWatch thus provides an invaluable public service to consumers or anyone else interested in the safety of prescription medications. A few facts from the report: “FDA received 833,076 new reports of adverse drug events” in 2014 – “an increase of 12.7% from 2013” 35% of total reports (293,810 reports) “indicated fatal, disabling, or other serious injuries that occurred in the U.S.” Reports of serious injuries in the U.S. “increased by 59,531 cases (25.4%) in 2014” The QuarterWatch report singles out a few drugs, such as Humira, Enbrel, and Lipitor, for leading numbers of reported adverse drug events You can follow this link to view the most recent QuarterWatch report.

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Zofran Birth Defect Case Status

Are you pregnant and are taking the drug Zofran or a generic version to combat nausea or morning sickness? Did you take Zofran and subsequently have a child suffering from cleft palate or other birth defects? Then you could be eligible to participate in a lawsuit against Zofran manufactuter GlaxoSmithKline, whose product has been suspected of causing severe defects among babies born to women who took the drug. Lawsuits alleging Zofran use caused birth defects are cropping up across the country.

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| Read Time: 3 minutes | Dangerous Drugs

History of Zofran in the US – Key Dates

What do consumers need to know about the history of Zofran use in the U.S.? Here are some key dates: Zofran has been on the market since January 1991, when the U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved manufacturer Glaxo Wellcome’s new drug to treat nausea and vomiting caused by chemotherapy treatments. Nearly 25 years later, Zofran and its generic counterpart are under fire, with lawsuits being filed against the drug maker accusing it of causing birth defects in babies born to mothers who used the drug and also heart ailments in patients who take it.

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